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Kevin In The Press

Unmaintained elevator machine

Unmaintained elevator machineImproperly maintained equipment invariably leads to unscheduled shut downs and increases the chances of injury to passengers. The life expectancy of the equipment is also substantially reduced.

Wooden gate on open side of freight elevator

Wooden gate on open side of freight elevatorWooden gates are no longer permitted. They don’t fulfill the code requirements for deflection. The owner should be apprised of that fact. Should injury occur, he will bear the cost.

Man sliding down escalator handrail

Man sliding down escalator handrailSliding down an escalator handrail is extremely dangerous. Anti-slide devices are installed parallel to the handrail to prevent this.

Children standing side by side on an escalator step

Children standing side by side on an escalator stepChildren should never ride an escalator alone. In addition neither child is holding both handrails, only one child is holding one. If they were to fall the consequences would be substantial.

Fallen man at base of an escalator

Fallen man at base of an escalatorOften the precursor to a lawsuit – the passenger here was holding a cup instead of holding the handrail. His attention was elsewhere causing him to fall.

Man pulling bedding up escalator

Man pulling bedding up escalatorTransferring anything on an escalator is inherently dangerous. It has often occurred that the articles being transferred have jammed an escalator causing it to stop quickly causing others on the stair to fall, with severe injuries resulting. In addition baggage on the escalator has jammed causing other passengers to fall over it.

Elevator car top equipment

What the riding public should never see! The two circular metal mechanisms in the foreground are the door operator sheaves which open and close the car doors. They are controlled by the blue box immediately above and behind the sheave assemblies. To the left of the blue box is the door operator motor. The railing around the outer perimeter of the car top is a safety railing to prevent accidental falls. The blue rail running perpendicular to the safety railing is the cross-head, which is a structural member of the cab assembly. Mounted on the cross head, from left to right, is a car-top inspection run box, the hoist cables, and a light assembly.

What the riding public should never see! The two circular metal mechanisms in the foreground are the door operator sheaves which open and close the car doors. They are controlled by the blue box immediately above and behind the sheave assemblies. To the left of the blue box is the door operator motor. The railing around the outer perimeter of the car top is a safety railing to prevent accidental falls. The blue rail running perpendicular to the safety railing is the cross-head, which is a part of the sling assembly, within which the cab is installed. Mounted on the cross head, from left to right, is a car-top inspection run box, the hoist cables, and a light assembly.

Typical overhead traction-type driving machine

An example of a very typical overhead traction-type (cable type) driving machine. Machine components, as viewed from left to right, are; the DC current hoist motor, the brake assembly, and the large round traction sheave. The hoist cables (ropes) can be seen projecting from the front and rear portions of the traction sheave. One side of the hoist cable(s) descends down the hoistway and secures to the elevator car top. The other side of the hoist cable(s) descends and connects to the counterweight assembly.

New elevator hoistway construction

It all begins somewhere. This is an example of a new elevator hoistway under construction. The elevator guide rails and cab enclosure will be installed upon completion of the hoistway construction.

Example of defective in car handrail

Although atypical, handrails in elevators can fail. This handrail appeared, at first glance, to be secure. When pulled on during a routine examination  it fell out of the mounting standoff to which it was attached.